Letters of Importance

Letters

Letter to Senator Ron Wyden providing clarification on the applicability of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) to college and university students’ medical records.

Letter to Senator Ron Wyden providing clarification on the applicability of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) to college and university students’ medical records, including therapy and treatment records, held by educational institutions.

Letters

Letter to Representative Suzanne Bonamici providing clarification on the applicability of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)to college and university students’ medical records

Letter to Representative Suzanne Bonamici providing clarification on the applicability of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) to college and university students’ medical records, including therapy and treatment records, held by educational institutions. 

Guidance and Best Practices
Letters

Joint FERPA Letter with ED HHS regarding Uninterrupted Scholars Act

This letter written to Chief State School Officers and State Child Welfare Directors between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and Department of Education describes the Uninterrupted Scholars Act and its impact on data sharing between education and health and human service agencies.

Letters

Letter to School District re: SES Providers Contacting Parents

Letter to a school district providing assurance that Approved Supplemental Educational Providers are not prohibited by FERPA from contacting parents and guardians of students served in SES programs in previous years. It notes that FERPA does not permit a provider to disclose students' Personally Identifiable Information third parties, without the written consent of the student's parent.

Letters

Disclosure of Education Records to Outside Service Providers

Letter to the Clark County School District regarding whether the District is permitted to disclose education records, without a parent's prior written consent, to a company that operates an online system that allows parents to access their child's current grades and class attendance reports, as well as other school-related functions.